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"Renn A. Holness is a gifted lawyer and author to over 1000 legal blog articles. Married father of two daughters, son of a neurosurgeon and founder of Holness Law Group."

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ICBC Settlement amounts

ICBC Withdraws Settlement Offers for 2019 Creating Another Financial Disaster

As an advocate for the injured for over 23 years I have never experienced the level of discrimination now faced by auto injury victims in British Columbia. The Attorney General, our chief advisor of law to the government,  distains injury victims access to legal advice and the court system, recently blaming lawyers for pushing back against the monopoly…

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$200,000 ICBC Offer to Settle Rejected and $199,471 Awarded

This ICBC offer to settle case raises two important issues: (1) What ICBC accident benefits should be deducted from the award against the driver; and (2) Should a claimant be denied costs for not accepting an ICBC offer which is the same as the court award. This ICBC personal injury case involved two car accidents.  First…

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$730,000 Rear End Injury Settlement Awarded Costs Above BCMA Guidelines

The claimant was rear ended when stopped in traffic which caused her vehicle to strike the rear of another vehicle in front of her. This personal injury case settled on the Friday prior to the commencement of trial the following Monday. The settlement was for payment of $736,807.00 new money, plus assessable costs and disbursements for…

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Claimant Beats Best Offer to Settle but no Double Costs

An ICBC injury claim always gets to a point where offers to settle have to be made. If an injury claimant makes a reasonable offer and ICBC refuses to to accept the offer, the Court can punish ICBC if the court award in more than the offer. However, the rules of court allow judges to…

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Best Offer to Personal Injury Lawyer After Settlement Futile

ICBC injury claimants need to be aware that accepting an offer to settle is a binding agreement and further requests to ICBC to make their “best offer” will be futile. In today’s case study the court was asked by ICBC to declare that the personal injury lawsuit was settled for $20,000 plus court costs, for which the court…

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$212,000 ICBC Injury Settlement Ordered to be Paid by Drunk Driver

The victim of a drunk driving accident settled with ICBC by way of an all-inclusive payment by ICBC in the amount of $212,000.  The drunk driver responsible admitted the settlement was reasonable but denied being drunk and refused to repay ICBC the settlement amount paid to his victim, as is required in such cases of insurance…

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Late ICBC Offer Forces Judge to Use Discretion

This injury claimant alleged a number of injuries including brain injury, which was said to have resulted in a loss of about $4 million in capital, as well as about $1,850,000 income to the date of trial and thereafter.  In reasons for judgment indexed at 2014 BCSC 2113, real damages were assessed at $77,750. This is a case…

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Settlement Offer to ICBC Beaten and Double Costs Awarded

In this ICBC personal injury case the claimant was awarded $622,500 after she was injured by a vehicle that turned left across the path of her vehicle. The claimant had however made an offer to settle to ICBC one week before the trial for $315,000 plus costs and disbursements, which was rejected.  The claimant  was therefore entitled to an…

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Prior ICBC Settlement not Deducted from Injury Award

Should a prior ICBC Settlement amount be deducted from a second and new car accident injury claim? We answer this question in today’s a motor vehicle accident case review. This personal injury case involves  a chronic pain claimant with a prior accident she settled with ICBC for $153,300 plus case expenses (the “Settlement”).  Should the claimant be awarded a global amount…

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The Proper Wording for an Offer to Settle

For  ICBC personal injury claims, and other personal injury cases, the laws governing settlement offers are more confusing than any time in history. The Supreme Court Rules changed in 2010 and judicial interpretation since then has set settlement negotiations on a new course.  The consequences for failing to accept a reasonable offer are now left to judicial…

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